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I always thought the problem was me.

I love Thai food.  I have ever since my college roommate Christina (who had lived in Thailand as a teen) and I used to splurge on lunches at the Thai restaurant across the street from our dorm.  But every time I got a Thai cookbook – and all of them were colorful, inspiring productions you could almost taste – I just couldn’t get through them.

I could get the lemongrass and galangal and the kaffir lime leaf.  But there was always something: gaeng hang lae powder, green tamarind pods, dried salted radishes, one particular kind of fish.  I wanted to do it right! and so the best became the enemy of the good, and I never made those recipes.

Every so often I would get an “easy” Thai book.  But it would turn out to be all soy sauce, oyster sauce, ginger and garlic – pretty much like an “easy” Chinese book.  Where was the easy Thai book that actually tasted Thai?

So here at last it is.  It’s not *totally* easy.  But it’s not dump-a-Maesri-curry-paste-in-some-coconut-milk either.   The writing’s entertaining, the recipes work, and the flavors will knock your socks off.  What more could you ask? (other than slightly larger print, as usual.)

Click here to read today’s review of  ‘Simple Thai Food’ in the Boston Globe.   Hit the paywall?  Click here for the PDF version of this week’s ‘Simple Thai Food’ review

Spice books – I almost never review them, because they tend not to teach me what I really want to learn.  I’m interested in Grand Unified Theories of spice – in botanical relationships and historically documented foodways.  More often, the message of spice books is more “This is how I use spices” or “Everyone should use more spices!”

But this book, which hails from Seattle’s World Spice Merchants at Pike Place, is smartly organized and thoroughly informative.  And I finally got the full benefit of the magnetic spice organization system I put in last year!  It took 22 tins to make ras el hanout, and it was worth it just to find out how (relatively) easy it was compared to the furtive, frantic searches in dark cabinets of years past.

spice tins

Click here to read today’s review of  ‘World Spice at Home’ in the Boston Globe.   Hit the paywall?  Click here for the PDF version of this week’s ‘World Spice at Home’ review

A Susie Middleton cookbook is always an occasion for celebration.  As she demonstrated in Fast, Fresh & Green and The Fresh & Green Table, the former cooking magazine editor turned small farm owner has a feel for finely tuned, robustly flavored food using the freshest ingredients.

I tested this book at the beginning of the growing season, when few crops besides arugula and radishes were ready.  Now, at the end of the season, there have been the usual garden heartaches (fingerlings and tomatoes lost to blight, poor output from the new strawberries) but a few proud stands of greens and beans remain.  No matter how hard-won and scant your own end-of summer kitchen garden may look, you’ll find a fitting way to enjoy the last of it in these pages.

Click here to read today’s review of  ‘Fresh from the Farm’ in the Boston Globe.   Hit the paywall?  Click here for the PDF version of this week’s ‘Fresh from the Farm’ review

I’m sure there are those who can resist a Southern cookbook, but I am not one of them.  With his 2009 Real Cajun, Donald Link had already convinced me that he was the rare restaurant chef whose recipes could translate effortlessly to the home kitchen (though in this I’m sure his co-author, Paula Disbrowe, should also be given credit).

Southern cookbooks often make me cry for the ingredients I can’t easily get here in New England – the tasso ham, the lady peas, the crayfish – and this one was no exception.  Still, I found enough doable recipes to make for one flavor-forward, porky, and very satisfying week of testing.

Click here to read today’s review of  ‘Down South’ in the Boston Globe.   Hit the paywall?  Click here for the PDF version of this week’s ‘Down South’ review

On  Cookbook Finder, my cookbook-rating app, you’ll find write-ups of 250+ of the latest cookbooks, and regular cookbook news.  It’s the only up-to-the-minute cookbook app anywhere!

What, you say you’re already too much of a cookbook addict?  Ah, but you see, Cookbook Finder will help you get control of your problem.  Now you’ll only buy the good ones.

Available for  iPhone/iPad and Android devices.

Charm.  It’s an elusive quality in cookbooks – and when it works, it’s a heady combination of good storytelling, intriguing recipes, and great book design.

Kim Sunée’s new book exudes charm – great, billowing waves of charm that overwhelm your senses and hijack your judgement.  It’s the kind of book you fall in love with in the store; when you bring it home, you make the recipe that looks most mouthwatering to you, and you love it.  From that point on, the book holds a cherished place in your heart – even if you try another recipe and it fails (it must be my fault! you think), or if you try no more recipes and it becomes one of those one-dish books we all have.

But when you test a book for a week and live with it, you get a slightly different perspective.  And after that dazzling first date, you may find a different personality hovers just beyond view.  And for me, A Mouthful of Stars turned out to be a book of many faces – a true mixed bag.

Click here to read today’s review of  ‘A Mouthful of Stars’ in the Boston Globe.   Hit the paywall?  Click here for the PDF version of this week’s ‘Mouthful of Stars’ review

On  Cookbook Finder, my cookbook-rating app, you’ll find write-ups of 250+ of the latest cookbooks, and regular cookbook news.  It’s the only up-to-the-minute cookbook app anywhere!

What, you say you’re already too much of a cookbook addict?  Ah, but you see, Cookbook Finder will help you get control of your problem.  Now you’ll only buy the good ones.

Available for  iPhone/iPad and Android devices.

Icy! Fizzy! Sparkling! Sweet!

Doesn’t that sound good?

Thanks to a new SodaStream Source and a sleek Mastrad PureFizz, our household has been enjoying much-needed liquid refreshment lately.  In my latest story, I cover a few different soda cookbooks that will have you on your way to bubbly nirvana in no time.

You might not think you want one more appliance to clutter your kitchen – that’s a song I sing all the time myself – but on these sweltering July afternoons, you’ll swear it was worth it.  Really!

Click here to read today’s  DIY soda story in the Boston Globe.   Hit the paywall?  Click here for the PDF version

On  Cookbook Finder, my cookbook-rating app, you’ll find write-ups of 250+  of the latest cookbooks, and regular cookbook news.  It’s the only up-to-the-minute cookbook app anywhere!

What, you say you’re already too much of a cookbook addict?  Ah, but you see, Cookbook Finder will help you get control of your problem.  Now you’ll only buy the good ones.

Available for  iPhone/iPad and Android devices.

I know you’re wondering, so let’s get right to it: “B. T. C.” stands for “Be The Change,”  and you know right away that the story, when you get to it, is gonna be a heartwarmer.

And so it is.  The tale of the Little Grocery That Could – and several other small businesses that did – made it to the New York Times, which told a tale of rural revitalization in tiny Water Valley, Mississippi.

The story’s great, the design charming, the ethos both retro and sustainable.  The recipes?  Mixed bag.

Click here to read today’s review of  ‘The B.T.C. Old-Fashioned Grocery Cookbook’ in the Boston Globe.   Hit the paywall?  Click here for the PDF version of this week’s ‘B.T.C. Old-Fashioned Grocry Cookbook’ review

On  Cookbook Finder, my cookbook-rating app, you’ll find write-ups of 250+ of the latest cookbooks, and regular cookbook news.  It’s the only up-to-the-minute cookbook app anywhere!

What, you say you’re already too much of a cookbook addict?  Ah, but you see, Cookbook Finder will help you get control of your problem.  Now you’ll only buy the good ones.

Available for  iPhone/iPad and Android devices.

Tandoori chicken. Falafel. Pad Thai. Gnocchi. Souvlaki. Goulash. Roghan josh. Empanadas. Pastitsio. Baklava. Gado gado.

It’s good to live in a melting pot, isn’t it?  Practically everything we love to eat comes from somewhere else.  After reaching these shores, it usually makes a stop for a while at somebody’s little first-generation restaurant, hanging out there for a few decades before the native-born have the nerve to try reproducing it in their home kitchens.

Cooking Light Global Kitchen may not pass the newness test, but it doesn’t have to.  These are streamlined – but not dumbed-down – versions of global classics.  And they do the most important thing a recipe can do when it comes to cuisines you’re not that familiar with: they work.

Click here to read today’s review of  ‘Cooking Light Global Kitchen’ in the Boston Globe.   Hit the paywall?  Click here for the PDF version of this week’s ‘Cooking Light Global Kitchen’ review

On  Cookbook Finder, my cookbook-rating app, you’ll find write-ups of 250+ of the latest cookbooks, and regular cookbook news.  It’s the only up-to-the-minute cookbook app anywhere!

What, you say you’re already too much of a cookbook addict?  Ah, but you see, Cookbook Finder will help you get control of your problem.  Now you’ll only buy the good ones.

Available for  iPhone/iPad and Android devices.

Today’s post is good for you and bad for you!

We’ve had a bounty of asparagus from the garden for the last 4 weeks.  Little did I realize when we planted them, in two batches some 10 years and 4 years ago, that we’d be talking about one bunch a day right through spring.  Finding new ways to prepare asparagus has taxed my ingenuity – but I’ve shared some of my favorites in today’s story.  After it went to press, I discovered I also love asparagus lightly oiled and grilled…not that you even need a recipe for that.

Then, some of the most memorable testing in months happened a couple of weeks ago when I tackled Fried & True - an entire book’s worth of fried chicken recipes.  My editor took pity on me and said I didn’t have to fry chicken all week, but I still did it twice (plus one oven-fry), and tested a whole bunch of high-octane sides for good measure.  Many thanks to our good friends Mark, Mark, Cindy and Bella for helping us make our way through glistening heaps of poultry.

Click here to read today’s asparagus story and review of ‘Fried & True’ in the Boston Globe.   Hit the paywall?  Click here for the PDF version of asparagus story or PDF version of Fried & True review

On  Cookbook Finder, my cookbook-rating app, you’ll find write-ups of 250+  of the latest cookbooks, and regular cookbook news.  It’s the only up-to-the-minute cookbook app anywhere!

What, you say you’re already too much of a cookbook addict?  Ah, but you see, Cookbook Finder will help you get control of your problem.  Now you’ll only buy the good ones.

Available for  iPhone/iPad and Android devices.

Now that NPR’s Kitchen Window series has come to its bittersweet conclusion, I’ve found myself once again with a little more time for local food reporting.  My first foray back on the beat took me an hour north to New Hampshire, where I spent the afternoon at a dairy farm owned by a family that’s lived and worked there for 200 years.

The realities of small farming being what they are, the family has diversified into cheese and small-batch ‘switchel’ vodka.  Never heard of switchel?  It’s a traditional farmhand drink also known as “haymaker’s punch” – and unique to New England.

Food reporting is a little more involved than cookbook reviewing, but I enjoyed learning about switchel – not to mention sampling it after – and seeing some less-well-known corners of the region.  More food-beat-cop work to come.

Click here to read today’s Boggy Meadow Farm story in the Boston Globe.   Hit the paywall?  Click here for the PDF version

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